Securing Traffic into Cloud Foundry

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This topic describes the options for securing HTTP traffic into your Pivotal Application Service deployment with TLS certificates. You can configure the location where your deployment terminates TLS depending on your needs and certificate restrictions.

Protocol Support

The Gorouter supports HTTP/HTTPS requests only. For more information about features supported by the Gorouter, see the HTTP Routing topic.

To secure non-HTTP traffic over TCP Routing, terminate TLS at your load balancer or at the application. See TCP Routing for details.

TLS Termination Options for HTTP Routing

There are several options for terminating TLS for HTTP traffic. You can terminate TLS at the Gorouter, your load balancer, or at both.

The following table summarizes TLS termination options and which option to choose for your deployment.

Note: To ensure traffic is sent to the platform securely, Pivotal recommends as a minimum that you terminate TLS at the Gorouter. You can optionally terminate TLS at the Load Balancer.

If the following applies to you: Then configure TLS termination at: Related topic and configuration procedure
  • You want the optimum balance of performance and security, and
  • You want to make minimum changes to your load balancer, or
  • You are deploying CF to AWS. For information about AWS limitations, see TLS Cipher Suite Support by AWS ELBs.
Gorouter only Terminating TLS at the Gorouter Only
  • You require TLS termination at a load balancer, or
  • You want the highest level of security, and
  • You do not mind a slightly less performant deployment.
Load Balancer and Gorouter Terminating TLS at the Load Balancer and Gorouter
  • You require TLS termination at a load balancer, and
  • You prefer unencrypted traffic between the Load Balancer and the Gorouter.
Load Balancer only Terminating TLS at the Load Balancer Only
Optionally, if you are deploying HAProxy, andThen in addition, terminate SSL/TLS at:Related topic and configuration procedure
  • You would like to secure traffic to the HAProxy.
HAProxyTerminating SSL/TLS at HAProxy

Certificate Requirements

The following requirements apply to the certificates you use to secure traffic into PAS:

  • You must obtain at least one TLS certificate for your environment.
    • In a production environment, use a signed TLS certificate (trusted) from a known certificate authority (CA).
    • In a development or testing environment, you can use a trusted CA certificate or a self-signed certificate. You can generate a self-signed certificate with openssl or a similar tool.

      Alternately, you can use the PAS Ops Manager interface to generate a certificate for you. Certificates generated in PAS are signed by the Ops Manager Certificate Authority. They are not technically self-signed, but they are sometimes referred to as “Self-Signed Certificates” in the Ops Manager UI and throughout this documentation.

  • Certificates used in CF must be encoded in the PEM format.
  • The Gorouter supports mutual TLS, and validates a client provided certificate chain against its CA certificates if one is provided in the TLS handshake, but does not require it. Depending on whether you choose to terminate at both the Load Balancer and the Gorouter, or at the Gorouter alone, the client certificate may be that of the load balancer or of the originating client.
  • The certificate on the Gorouter must be associated with the correct hostname so that HTTPS can validate the request.
  • If wildcard certificates are not supported for some or all of your domains, then configure termination requests at the load balancer only. In this type of deployment, the load balancer passes unencrypted traffic to the Gorouter. As a result, you avoid having to reissue and reinstall certificates on the Gorouter for every app or UAA security zone.
  • Extended Validation (EV) certificates support multiple hostnames, like SAN, but do not support wildcards. As the Gorouter has not been tested with EV certificates, if EV certificates are required, then terminate TLS at the load balancer only.
  • Given the dynamic and multi-tenant nature of PAS, use of wildcard domains is highly recommended to avoid the need for adding an additional certificate for each application.

Multiple Certificates

In order to support custom domains on CF, an operator has to configure the Gorouter with a certificate that represents the domain. It is recommended that operators add a new certificate instead of reissuing a single certificate when adding TLS support for an additional domain. Using multiple certificates provides a security benefit in that it prevents clients from discovering all the custom domains of applications running on a CF platform.

The Gorouter supports SNI and can be configured with multiple certificates, each which may optionally include wildcard and alternative names. The Gorouter uses SNI to determine the correct certificate to present in a TLS handshake. It requires clients to support the SNI protocol by sending a server name outside the encrypted request payload. For clients that do not support SNI, the Gorouter presents a default certificate. The default is the first certificate keypair in the Gorouter’s configuration.

The Gorouter decides which certificate to provide in the TLS handshake as follows:

  • If a client provides an SNI header with a ServerName that matches to a configured certificate keypair, the Gorouter returns the matching certificate.
  • If a client provides an SNI header with a ServerName that does not match a configured certificate keypair, the Gorouter returns the default certificate.

The first certificate keypair listed is used as the default.

The Gorouter supports both RSA and ECDSA certificates in PEM encoding. In the case that a certificate chain is required, the order should be as follows: primary certificate, intermediate certificate, then root certificate.

How to Configure Multiple Certificate Keypairs

To configure multiple HTTPS certificate keypairs for PAS, add each keypair along with a meaningful name in the applicable Certificates and Private Keys for HAProxy and Router fields of the Networking configuration screen in PAS. For more information, see the Deploying PAS topic for your platform. For example, see Deploying PAS on GCP if you are using GCP.

In PCF, multiple certificates configured for the Gorouter are also configured for HAProxy.

TLS Cipher Suite Support

Some CF components like the Gorouter support additional TLS cipher suites to accommodate older clients. As a security best practice, only configure the TLS cipher suites that you need for your deployment.

Default Gorouter Cipher Suites

By default, the Gorouter supports the following TLS cipher suites, both of which require TLS v1.2:

RFC OpenSSL
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384

You can override the default cipher suites in the TLS Cipher Suites for Router field in the Networking tab of the PAS tile. See the following procedures for either Gorouter Only or Load Balancer and Gorouter for more information about using custom SSL ciphers.

TLS Cipher Suite Support by AWS Load Balancers

AWS Classic Load Balancers (formerly referred to as ELBs) support configuration of cipher suites for front-end connections with clients only. When configuring Classic Load Balancers to forward requests to Gorouters over TLS, operators may encounter a “Cipher Suite Mismatch” error. This is because the cipher suites supported by Classic Load Balancers for TLS handshakes with backends (Gorouters in this case) are hardcoded, undocumented, and do not support the Gorouter default cipher suites.

Operators have two options:

  • Configure Classic Load Balancer listeners in TCP mode so that TCP connections from clients are passed through the Classic Load Balancer to Gorouters on port 443. Then Gorouters are the first point of TLS termination.
  • If you require TLS termination at an AWS load balancer in addition to terminating at the Gorouter, use AWS Application Load Balancers (ALBs) that support the Gorouter default cipher suites.

TLS v1.2

The following cipher suites are optionally supported for TLS v1.2 only:

RFC OpenSSL
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 AES128-GCM-SHA256
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384 AES256-GCM-SHA384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA ECDHE-ECDSA-RC4-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA ECDHE-RSA-RC4-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA ECDHE-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384 ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256 AES128-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256 ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_CHACHA20_POLY1305 ECDHE-RSA-CHACHA20-POLY1305
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_CHACHA20_POLY1305 ECDHE-ECDSA-CHACHA20-POLY1305

TLS v1.0 and v1.1

The following cipher suites are optionally supported for TLS v1.0 and TLS v1.1 only:

RFC OpenSSL
TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA RC4-SHA
TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA DES-CBC3-SHA
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA AES128-SHA
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA AES256-SHA

You can override the default cipher suites in the TLS Cipher Suites for Router field in the Networking tab of the PAS tile. See the following procedures for either Gorouter Only or Load Balancer and Gorouter for more information about using custom SSL ciphers.

See Golang Constants and OpenSSL Cipher Suites for more information about supported ciphers.

Note: ECDSA ciphers require a certificate and key for DSA, as opposed to RSA.

Mutual Authentication with Clients

Gorouter supports validation of client certificates in TLS handshakes with clients, also known as mutual authentication. Operators can choose whether Gorouter requests client certificates and when requesting certificates, whether or not to require them.

By default, Gorouter requests but does not require client certificates in TLS handshakes.

To configure Gorouter behavior for handling client certificates, select one of the options in the Router behavior for Client Certificates field of the Networking configuration screen in PAS.

  • Router does not request client certificates. The Gorouter does not request client certificates in TLS handshakes so clients will not provide them and validation of client certificates does not occur. This option is incompatible with the XFCC configuration options TLS terminated for the first time at HAProxy and TLS terminated for the first time at the Router in PAS because these options require mutual authentication.

  • Router requests but does not require client certificates. The Gorouter requests client certificates in TLS handshakes. The handshake will fail if the client certificate is not signed by a CA configured for the router. This is the default configuration.

  • Router requires client certificates. The Gorouter requests and requires client certificates in TLS handshakes. The handshake will fail if a client cert is not provided or if the client certificate is not signed by a CA configured for the router.

The behavior controlled by this property is global; it applies to all requests received by Gorouters so configured.

If Gorouter is the first point of TLS termination (your load balancer does not terminate TLS, and passes the request through to Gorouter over TCP), consider the following:

  • Only option Router does not request client certificates should be used with PAS, as the Gorouters are in that product receive requests for the system domain. Many clients of CF platform APIs do not present client certificates in TLS handshakes, so the first point of TLS termination for requests to the system domain must not request them.

  • All options may be used for routers deployed with the Isolation Segment tile, as these only receive requests for app domains.

  • Options Router requests but does not require client certificates and Router requires client certificates will trigger browsers to prompt users to select a certificate if the browser is not already configured with a certificate signed by one of the CAs configured for the router.

If Gorouter is not the first point of TLS termination, this property can be used to secure communications between the Load Balancer and Gorouter. The router must be configured with the CA used to sign the client certification the load balancer will present.

WARNING: Requests to the platform will fail upon upgrade if your load balancer is configured to present a client certificate in the TLS handshake with Gorouter but Gorouter has not been configured with the certificate authority used to sign it. To mitigate this issue, select Router does not request client certificates for Router behavior for Client Certificate Validation in the Networking pane or configure the router with the appropriate CA.

Terminating TLS at the Gorouter Only

In this configuration, the load balancer does not terminate TLS for CF domains at all. Instead, it passes through the underlying TCP connection to the Gorouter.

This option is the recommended and more performant option, establishing and terminating a single TLS connection.

The following diagram illustrates communication between the client, load balancer, Gorouter, and app.

Pass through

Traffic between the load balancer and the Gorouter is encrypted only if the client request is encrypted.

About HTTP Header Forwarding

If you terminate TLS at the Gorouter only, your load balancer does not send HTTP headers.

The Gorouter appends the X-Forwarded-For and X-Forwarded-Proto headers to requests forwarded to applications and platform system components. X-Forwarded-For is set to the IP address of the source. Depending on the behavior of your load balancer, this may be the IP address of your load balancer. For the Gorouter to deliver the IP address of the client to applications, configure your load balancer to forward the IP address of the client or configure your load balancer to send the client IP address using the PROXY protocol. The Gorouter will set X-Forwarded-Proto to the scheme of the client request.

For more information on HTTP headers in CF, see HTTP Headers. If you are configuring the forwarding of client certificates, see Forward Client Certificate to Applications.

Procedure: Gorouter Only

Perform the following steps to configure SSL termination on the Gorouter in Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF):

  1. Configure your load balancer to pass through TCP requests from the client to the Gorouter.

  2. Navigate to the Ops Manager Installation Dashboard.

  3. Click the Pivotal Application Service (PAS) tile in the Installation Dashboard.

  4. Click Networking.

  5. For PCF deployments on OpenStack or vSphere, choose IP addresses for the Gorouters from the subnet configured for Ops Manager and enter them in the Router IPs field. Then configure your load balancer to forward requests for the above domains to these IP addresses. For more information, see the PAS networking configuration topic for OpenStack or vSphere.

  6. In the Certificates and Private Keys for HAProxy and Router field, click the Add button to define at least one certificate keypair for HAProxy and Router. For each certificate keypair that you add, assign a name, enter the PEM-encoded certificate chain and PEM-encoded private key. You can either upload your own certificate or generate an RSA certificate in PAS. For options and instructions on creating a certificate for your wildcard domains, see Creating a Wildcard Certificate for PCF Deployments.

  7. In the Minimum version of TLS supported by HAProxy and Router, select the minimum version of TLS to use in Gorouter communications. The Gorouter uses TLS v1.2 by default. If you need to accommodate clients that use an older version of TLS, select a lower minimum version. For a list of TLS ciphers supported by the Gorouter, see Cipher Suites.

  8. Under HAProxy forwards requests to Router over TLS, select Disable.

  9. If you want to use a specific set of TLS ciphers for the Gorouter, configure TLS Cipher Suites for Router. Enter an ordered, colon-separated list of TLS cipher suites in the OpenSSL format. For example, if you have selected support for an earlier version of TLS, you can enter cipher suites supported by this version. For a list of TLS ciphers supported by the Gorouter, see Cipher Suites. Otherwise, leave the default values in this field.

  10. (Optional) If you are not using SSL encryption or if you are using self-signed certificates, you can select Disable SSL certificate verification for this environment. Selecting this checkbox also disables SSL verification for route services.

    Use this checkbox only for development and testing environments. Do not select it for production environments.

  11. (Optional) If you do not want the Gorouter to accept any non-encrypted HTTP traffic, select the Disable HTTP on HAProxy and Router checkbox.

  12. In the Configure the CF Router support for the X-Forwarded-Client-Cert header field, select the third option, Strip the XFCC header when present and set it to the client certificate.

  13. Click Save.

  14. In the PAS tile, click Resource Config.

  15. In the Instances drop down for the HAPRoxy job, select 0 instances.

  16. Click Save.

Terminating TLS at the Load Balancer Only

In this configuration, your load balancer terminates TLS, and passes unencrypted traffic to the Gorouter, which routes it to your app. Traffic between the load balancer and the Gorouter is not encrypted.

This option is recommended if you cannot use SAN certificates and if you do not require traffic to be encrypted between the load balancer and the Gorouter.

The following diagram illustrates communication between the client, load balancer, Gorouter, and app.

Lb

About HTTP Header Forwarding

If you terminate TLS at your load balancer, then you must also configure the load balancer to append the X-Forwarded-For and X-Forwarded-Proto HTTP headers to the HTTP traffic it passes to the Gorouter.

For more information on HTTP headers in CF, see HTTP Headers. If you are configuring the forwarding of client certificates, see Forward Client Certificate to Applications.

Procedure: Load Balancer Only

Perform the following steps to configure SSL termination on the load balancer only in Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF):

  1. Create an A record in your DNS that points to your load balancer IP address. The A record associates the System Domain and Apps Domain that you configure in the Domains section of the Pivotal Application Service (PAS) tile with the IP address of your load balancer.

    For example, with cf.example.com as the main subdomain for your Cloud Foundry deployment and a load balancer IP address 198.51.100.1, you must create an A record in your DNS that serves example.com and points *.cf to 198.51.100.1.

    Name Type Data Domain
    *.cf A 198.51.100.1 example.com
  2. Navigate to the Ops Manager Installation Dashboard.

  3. Click the PAS tile in the Installation Dashboard.

  4. Click Networking.

  5. For PCF deployments on OpenStack or vSphere, choose IP addresses for the Gorouters from the subnet configured for Ops Manager and enter them in the Router IPs field. Then configure your load balancer to forward requests for the above domains to these IP addresses. For more information, see the PAS networking configuration topic for OpenStack or vSphere.

  6. In the Certificates and Private Keys for HAProxy and Router field, click the Add button to define one certificate keypair for HAProxy and Router. Since you have opted for unencrypted traffic behind the load balancer, then you can generate an RSA certificate in PAS.

  7. In the Minimum version of TLS supported by HAProxy and Router, select the minimum version of TLS to use in HAProxy communications. HAProxy use TLS v1.2 by default. If you need to accommodate clients that use an older version of TLS, select a lower minimum version. For a list of TLS ciphers supported by the HAProxy, see Cipher Suites.

  8. Under HAProxy forwards requests to Router over TLS, select Disable.

  9. If you want to use a specific set of TLS ciphers for HAProxy, configure TLS Cipher Suites for HAProxy. Enter an ordered, colon-separated list of TLS cipher suites in the OpenSSL format. For example, if you have selected support for an earlier version of TLS, you can enter cipher suites supported by this version. Otherwise, leave the default values in this field.

  10. (Optional) If you are not using SSL encryption or if you are using self-signed certificates, you can select Disable SSL certificate verification for this environment. Selecting this checkbox also disables SSL verification for route services.

    Use this checkbox only for development and testing environments. Do not select it for production environments.

  11. (Optional) If you do not want HAProxy or the Gorouter to accept any non-encrypted HTTP traffic, select the Disable HTTP on HAProxy and Router checkbox.

  12. In the Configure the CF Router support for the X-Forwarded-Client-Cert header field, select Always forward the XFCC header in the request, regardless of the whether the client connection is mTLS.

  13. Click Save.

  14. After you complete the configuration in PCF, add your certificate or certificates to your load balancer, and configure its listening port. The procedures vary depending on your IaaS.

  15. Configure your load balancer to append the X-Forwarded-For and X-Forwarded-Proto headers to client requests.


    If the load balancer cannot be configured to provide the X-Forwarded-For header, the Gorouter will append it in requests forwarded to applications and system components, set to the IP address of the load balancer.

    Note: If the load balancer accepts unencrypted requests, it must provide the X-Forwarded-Proto header. Conversely, if the load balancer cannot be configured to send the X-Forwarded-Proto header, it should not accept unencrypted requests. Otherwise, applications and platform system components that require encrypted client requests will accept unencrypted requests when they should not accept them.

Terminating TLS at the Load Balancer and Gorouter

In this configuration two TLS connections are established: one from the client to the load balancer, and another from the load balancer to the Gorouter. This configuration secures all traffic between the load balancer and the Gorouter.

The following diagram illustrates communication between the client, load balancer, Gorouter, and app.

Lb and router

This option is less performant, but allows for termination at a load balancer, as well as secure traffic between the load balancer and the Gorouter.

Certificate Guidelines

In this deployment scenario, the following guidelines apply:

  • Certificates for the PAS domains must be stored on the load balancer, as well as on the Gorouter.
  • Generate certificates for your load balancer and the Gorouter with different keys. If the key for the certificate on the Gorouter is compromised, then the certificate on the load balancer is not at risk, and vice versa.
  • If you choose to host only one certificate on the Gorouter and many on your load balancer, configure your load balancer with the CA and hostname with which to validate the certificate hosted by the Gorouter.

About Hostname Verification

Hostname verification between the load balancer and the Gorouter is unnecessary when the load balancer is already configured with the Gorouter’s IP address to correctly route the request.

If the load balancer uses DNS resolution to route requests to the Gorouters, then you should enable hostname verification.

About HTTP Header Forwarding

If you terminate TLS at your load balancer, then you must configure the load balancer to append the X-Forwarded-For and X-Forwarded-Proto HTTP headers to requests it sends to the Gorouter.

If you terminate TLS at your load balancer but it does not support HTTP, such that it cannot append HTTP headers, a workaround exists. We recommend you use this workaround only if your load balancer does not accept unencrypted requests. Configure your load balancer to send the client IP address using the PROXY protocol, and enable PROXY in the Gorouter. As the X-Forwarded-Proto header will not be present, configure the Gorouter to force-set this header to ‘HTTPS’.

For more information on HTTP headers in CF, see HTTP Headers. If you are configuring the forwarding of client certificates, see Forward Client Certificate to Applications.

Procedure: Load Balancer and Gorouter

Perform the following steps to configure SSL termination on the Gorouter and load balancer in Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF):

  1. Create an A record in your DNS that points to your load balancer IP address. The A record associates the System Domain and Apps Domain that you configure in the Domains section of the Pivotal Application Service (PAS) tile with the IP address of your load balancer.

    For example, with cf.example.com as the main subdomain for your Cloud Foundry (CF) deployment and a load balancer IP address 198.51.100.1, you must create an A record in your DNS that serves example.com and points *.cf to 198.51.100.1.

    Name Type Data Domain
    *.cf A 198.51.100.1 example.com
  2. Navigate to the Ops Manager Installation Dashboard.

  3. Click the PAS tile in the Installation Dashboard.

  4. Click Networking.

  5. For PCF deployments on OpenStack or vSphere, choose IP addresses for the Gorouters from the subnet configured for Ops Manager and enter them in the Router IPs field. Then configure your load balancer to forward requests for the above domains to these IP addresses. For more information, see the PAS networking configuration topic for OpenStack or vSphere.

  6. In the Certificates and Private Keys for HAProxy and Router field, click the Add button to define at least one certificate keypair for HAProxy and Router. For each certificate keypair that you add, assign a name, enter the PEM-encoded certificate chain and PEM-encoded private key. You can either upload your own certificate or generate an RSA certificate in PAS. For options and instructions on creating a certificate for your wildcard domains, see Creating a Wildcard Certificate for PCF Deployments.

  7. In the Minimum version of TLS supported by HAProxy and Router, select the minimum version of TLS to use in HAProxy and Gorouter communications. The Gorouter use TLS v1.2 by default. If you need to accommodate clients that use an older version of TLS, select a lower minimum version. For a list of TLS ciphers supported by the Gorouter, see Cipher Suites.

  8. If you are using HAProxy, complete the following steps:

    1. Under HAProxy forwards requests to Router over TLS, select Enable.
    2. In the Certificate Authority for HAProxy Backend field, specify the Certificate Authority (CA) that signed the certificate you configured in the Certificate and Private Key for HAProxy and Router field.

      If you used the Generate RSA Certificate link to generate a self-signed certificate, then the CA to specify is the Ops Manager CA, which you can locate at the /api/v0/certificate_authorities endpoint in the Ops Manager API.

    3. If you want to use a specific set of TLS ciphers for HAProxy, configure TLS Cipher Suites for HAProxy. Enter an ordered, colon-separated list of TLS cipher suites in the OpenSSL format. For example, if you have selected support for an earlier version of TLS, you can enter cipher suites supported by this version. Otherwise, leave the default values in this field.
    4. In the Configure the CF Router support for the X-Forwarded-Client-Cert header field, select Always forward the XFCC header in the request, regardless of the whether the client connection is mTLS.
    5. Proceed to step 11.
  9. If you want to use a specific set of TLS ciphers for the Gorouter, configure TLS Cipher Suites for Router. Enter an ordered, colon-separated list of TLS cipher suites in the OpenSSL format. For example, if you have selected support for an earlier version of TLS, you can enter cipher suites supported by this version. For a list of TLS ciphers supported by the Gorouter, see Cipher Suites. Otherwise, leave the default values in this field.

  10. If you are not using HAProxy, complete the following steps:

    1. Under HAProxy forwards requests to Router over TLS, select Disable.
    2. In the Configure the CF Router support for the X-Forwarded-Client-Cert header field, select any of the available options depending on your client application needs. For more information about XFCC header forwarding, see Forward Client Certificate to Applications.
    3. In the PAS tile, click Resource Config.
    4. In the Instances drop down for the HAPRoxy job, select 0 instances.
    5. Click Save.
  11. (Optional) If you are not using SSL encryption or if you are using self-signed certificates, you can select Disable SSL certificate verification for this environment. Selecting this checkbox also disables SSL verification for route services.

    Use this checkbox only for development and testing environments. Do not select it for production environments.

  12. (Optional) If you do not want HAProxy or the Gorouter to accept any non-encrypted HTTP traffic, select the Disable HTTP on HAProxy and Router checkbox.

  13. Click Save.

  14. After you complete the configuration in PCF, add your certificate or certificates to your load balancer, and configure its listening port. The procedures vary depending on your IaaS.

  15. Configure your load balancer to append the X-Forwarded-For and X-Forwarded-Proto headers to client requests.


    If you cannot configure the load balancer to provide the X-Forwarded-For header, the Gorouter appends it in requests forwarded to applications and system components, set to the IP address of the load balancer.

    Note: If the load balancer accepts unencrypted requests, it must provide the X-Forwarded-Proto header. Conversely, if the load balancer cannot be configured to send the X-Forwarded-Proto header, it should not accept unencrypted requests. Otherwise, applications and platform system components that require encrypted client requests will accept unencrypted requests when they should not accept them.

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